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Australian researchers create first 3D-printed jet engine

Posted by vaimanika_admin on March 4, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , ,

Development hailed as a potential breakthrough in aircraft manufacture after university-CSIRO joint project prints two gas turbine engines

 

Australian researchers have created the world’s first 3D-printed jet engines, a breakthrough that could change the way aircraft are constructed.

Researchers from Monash University, aided by staff from the CSIRO and Deakin University, have printed two engines and put one of them on display at the International Air Show in Avalon, Victoria.

Monash and its spin-off company Amaero Engineering have registered interest from Airbus, Boeing and Raytheon, the defence manufacturer.

Researchers were given an old gas turbine engine by French firm Safran to copy, printing out two versions. The year-long process was led by Prof Xinhua Wu, the director of the Monash centre for additive manufacturing.

The aerospace industry is interested in the process of printing parts because of the reduced lead time, the lighter weight of parts and lower production costs.

Monash created the parts of the engine using printers that spread a very thin layer of metal powder across a base plate. A laser then formed the required shape using a computer-generated outline. This process was repeated over and over again until the part was completed.

“The project is a spectacular proof of concept that’s leading to significant contracts with aerospace companies,” said Ben Batagol, of Amaero Engineering.

“It was a challenge for the team and pushed the technology to new heights of success – no one has printed an entire engine commercially yet.”

 

Source: The Guardian

Boeing 777X Airplane | Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Posted by Vidyasagar Iyer on November 17, 2013 with No Commentsas , , , , , , ,

Introducing the 777X

 

The 777X is a twin-engine, twin-aisle success redefined. We like to think of it as the future of flight unfolding.

Building on the success of the 777 and 787 Dreamliner, the 777X is the largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world. Its folding raked wingtip and optimized span deliver greater efficiency, significant fuel savings and complete airport gate compatibility. And its GE9X engine is the most advanced, fuel-efficient commercial engine ever.

Performance, however, is just part of the story. The interior of the 777X is inspired by the comforts and conveniences of the 787 Dreamliner and will include larger windows, a wider cabin, new lighting and enhanced architecture — all of which will be custom tailored for a unique 777X experience.

 

The Future of Flight Unfolding

At Boeing we have always been focused on helping the world’s airlines be successful. We know airlines are continually anticipating challenges, perceiving possibilities and lining up opportunities to be successful in the very competitive commercial airline business.

The vital variable they must consider when thinking of long-term future success is the long-haul airplanes that will make up the fleet they operate.

These airplanes must have leading innovation, superior passenger appeal and unrivaled reliability. These airplanes must be ready for tomorrow and the decade beyond. They have to eclipse current efficiency expectations to ensure their success truly takes off. New airplanes that uniquely captivate passengers with a cabin experience so amazing that loyalty soars. And they must be so reliable and tailored to evolving network needs that airline operations can spend less time reacting to problems and more time focused on optimizing their business.

The new Boeing 777X does all of that — exceptionally well. It’s designed from the ground up to outperform against every metric, so airlines can rise above their daily revenue and operational challenges to focus on what matters most: securing passenger loyalty and servicing new destinations around the world.

 

 

777X Details & Specifications

The 777X will be the largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world, with 12 percent lower fuel consumption and 10 percent lower operating costs than the competition.

The 777-9X will have the lowest operating cost per seat of any commercial airplane. It will offer a range of 8,200 nautical miles (15,185 km) and seat more than 400 passengers. The 777-8X will compete directly with the A350-1000 and will boast an incredible range of up to 9,300 nautical miles (17,220 km) with seating for 350 passengers. The 777X is scheduled to enter service in 2020.

Like the 787 Dreamliner which was launched as the 7E7, the 777X will be formally named at a later date.