The link to our vaimanika.com has additional link वैमानिकशास्त्रम्.भारत

Posted by vaimanika_admin on March 19, 2017 with No Commentsas

I have been working on and looking for custom Indian web URL. We might be one of the first ones to have .भारत site enabled, now our page could be easily accessible over: http://वैमानिकशास्त्रम्.भारत

 

Australian researchers create first 3D-printed jet engine

Posted by vaimanika_admin on March 4, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , ,

Development hailed as a potential breakthrough in aircraft manufacture after university-CSIRO joint project prints two gas turbine engines

 

Australian researchers have created the world’s first 3D-printed jet engines, a breakthrough that could change the way aircraft are constructed.

Researchers from Monash University, aided by staff from the CSIRO and Deakin University, have printed two engines and put one of them on display at the International Air Show in Avalon, Victoria.

Monash and its spin-off company Amaero Engineering have registered interest from Airbus, Boeing and Raytheon, the defence manufacturer.

Researchers were given an old gas turbine engine by French firm Safran to copy, printing out two versions. The year-long process was led by Prof Xinhua Wu, the director of the Monash centre for additive manufacturing.

The aerospace industry is interested in the process of printing parts because of the reduced lead time, the lighter weight of parts and lower production costs.

Monash created the parts of the engine using printers that spread a very thin layer of metal powder across a base plate. A laser then formed the required shape using a computer-generated outline. This process was repeated over and over again until the part was completed.

“The project is a spectacular proof of concept that’s leading to significant contracts with aerospace companies,” said Ben Batagol, of Amaero Engineering.

“It was a challenge for the team and pushed the technology to new heights of success – no one has printed an entire engine commercially yet.”

 

Source: The Guardian

A lot of News on Vaimanika Shastra – Ancient India knew aerial combat tricks

Posted by vaimanika_admin on January 6, 2015 with 1 Commentas , , , , , , , , ,

These Days I have been receiving a number of Requests for Vaimanika Shastra Rediscovered – Password, and also as there is a Rejuvenation of Samskrit in India, a lot of people are looking back at our subjects such as Auyrveda, Vimana Stastra, etc.

On 5th I was notified that one of the News channels (Maratha) had been telecasting on Vaimanika Shastra. On various displays of the Samskrita Bharati’s Sammelanas, there were displays in the exhibition on the Vaimanika shastra, which also added on to people’s look for the subject online.

Today, in Bengaluru, multiple TV channels are also projecting on the same subject.

Our Research on Vaimanika is still incomplete, however, there is an ocean of topics to research on and a sea already open to us with results that were present on the Rediscovery that was conducted by: Wg. Cdr. M.P.Rao, etc. of Aeronautical Society of India on behalf of Aerospace Information Panel of Aeronautics Research and Development Board, B-Wing, Sena Bhavan, New Delhi 110011, India.

Below is an article from Times of India, that was published on 6th January 2015.

`Ancient India knew aerial combat tricks'
Chethan Kumar
Bengaluru
 
The Indian Air Force is struggling to fill its hangars with good quality made-in-India fighter planes as indigenous efforts for the Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) conceived over three decades ago are yet to make it to service standards.This, in a country whose ancient scientists had conceived workable fighter planes thousands of years ago. According to studies by the Indian Institute of Science and Aeronautical Society of India, Maharishi Bharadwaaj's Vymanika Shastra (science of aeronautics) is a pioneering work. Bharadwaaj, a Vedic scholar who lived thousands of years before modern aviation took off, not only thought about flying an aircraft but also deliberated on detecting and attacking an enemy aircraft using poisonous gases.However, Kota Harinarayan, considered the father of the LCA, had told TOI there isn't much knowledge about the technology Bharadwaaj had thought about, conceding that lack of good research has hurt us.Vymanika Shastra, recovered between 1860 and 1865, even has diagrams of aircraft auto pilot features, which became a reality only a few decades ago.
The handwritten Sanskrit manuscript was first translated into English by GR Josyer, the founder-director of International Academy of Sanskrit Research, following which several studies have cited it. The text, which has 32 secrets of flying, speaks of different aircraft, some with full-fledged military applications to those with application-specific onboard systems.

It also has descriptions of different layers of the atmosphere and use of various energies, including light to kill enemy planes or “vimanas“. One of the studies on the scripts notes that it referred even to aerial combat features, evasion tactics, support systems and air defence techniques through enemy detection --all needs of modern air forces of the world.

Most descriptions available are short and introductory in nature but experts like Air Marshal M Matheshwaran, in their studies, have said that there may have been more description and detailed ideas in subsequent texts.

 

Link to the Original Article: Click Here

The secret engine technology that made the SR-71 the fastest plane ever

Posted by vaimanika_admin on December 21, 2014 with 3 Commentsas , , ,

As posted by Jesus Diaz  at http://sploid.gizmodo.com/the-secret-engine-technology-that-made-the-sr-71-the-fa-1673510951

 

The secret engine technology that made the SR-71 the fastest plane ever

On December 17, 1903, the Wright brothers flew the first airplane ever at 6.8 mph (10.9 km/h). Only 61 years and five days later, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird took off. It’s still the world’s fastest airplane with a speed of 2,193 mph (3,530 km/h.) This fascinating video explains its top secret engine technology.

The secret engine technology that made the SR-71 the fastest plane ever

A ground test of the Pratt & Whitney J58 engine’s afterburner at full power.

It’s truly amazing that only 61 years and five days separate this

The secret engine technology that made the SR-71 the fastest plane ever

from this:

The secret engine technology that made the SR-71 the fastest plane ever

And it’s even more unbelievable that we haven’t been able to top that 51 years later (it will be exactly 51 years tomorrow—the first flight occurred on December 22, 1963.) Absolutely incredible.

Found: ‘User guide’ for Mahabharata weapons – Times Of India

Posted by Vidyasagar Iyer on December 7, 2013 with 3 Commentsas , , , , ,

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: Ever wondered how our mythological superheroes operated those deadly weapons such as agneyastra, varunastra, brahmastra and nagpash?

A manuscript found from the collections of Ashtavaidyan Vaidyamadham Cheriya Narayanan Namboodiri, who passed away recently, clearly mentions the mantras to use brahmastra, agneyastra, among others. The 63-folio manuscript in palm leaves, believed to be rewritten about 120 years ago, is the only manuscript retrieved so far in the country that tells how to use all the deadly weapons mentioned in the Mahabharata in about 48 well-described mantras.

“It was Cheriya Narayanan Namboodiri’s wish to digitize all his manuscript collections — 1,300 bundles — for the benefit of researchers, students and the future generation. The particular manuscript was noticed while we were digitizing the collections using the most reliable method, reprography,” said A R Krishnakumar, project manager at Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences (CCRAS). Krishnakumar is part of a team from the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA), New Delhi that has been bestowed with the responsibility of digitizing all the manuscripts available with both public and private parties in the country. “People may wonder why the manuscripts should be digitized. It is because they would throw light on our history, culture, customs, ancient religions besides giving information on the environment, health and science of ancient times,” said Krishnakumar.

“Till now, we haven’t even used 15% of the information from the manuscripts being written on ayurveda. Yet ayurveda is considered to be one of the most accepted system of medicine in the world. Now imagine if the knowledge in five lakh-odd bundles of manuscripts are made available to the society, how much more effective would ayurveda be,” he added.

“We had digitized a portion of the manuscripts available with libraries, colleges, universities and other institutions in Kerala a few years ago. We started the second phase of the initiative from Vaidyamadham at Mezhathur in Palakkad district. Our next destination is Kanippayyur Mana near Kunnamkulam, famous for thachu sasthra (architectural science), and other centres that have hundreds of manuscripts preserved with them. Thankfully, all these private parties are now coming forward to share the knowledge they have been preserving from the past,” said senior reprographic officer of IGNCA Krishnakumar B.

Krishnakumar, adding that the knowledge in manuscripts is not limited only to the subject of ayurveda, but covers nuances in the subjects of chemistry, physics, and astrology in detail.

 

Source Times of India

Boeing 777X Airplane | Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Posted by Vidyasagar Iyer on November 17, 2013 with No Commentsas , , , , , , ,

Introducing the 777X

 

The 777X is a twin-engine, twin-aisle success redefined. We like to think of it as the future of flight unfolding.

Building on the success of the 777 and 787 Dreamliner, the 777X is the largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world. Its folding raked wingtip and optimized span deliver greater efficiency, significant fuel savings and complete airport gate compatibility. And its GE9X engine is the most advanced, fuel-efficient commercial engine ever.

Performance, however, is just part of the story. The interior of the 777X is inspired by the comforts and conveniences of the 787 Dreamliner and will include larger windows, a wider cabin, new lighting and enhanced architecture — all of which will be custom tailored for a unique 777X experience.

 

The Future of Flight Unfolding

At Boeing we have always been focused on helping the world’s airlines be successful. We know airlines are continually anticipating challenges, perceiving possibilities and lining up opportunities to be successful in the very competitive commercial airline business.

The vital variable they must consider when thinking of long-term future success is the long-haul airplanes that will make up the fleet they operate.

These airplanes must have leading innovation, superior passenger appeal and unrivaled reliability. These airplanes must be ready for tomorrow and the decade beyond. They have to eclipse current efficiency expectations to ensure their success truly takes off. New airplanes that uniquely captivate passengers with a cabin experience so amazing that loyalty soars. And they must be so reliable and tailored to evolving network needs that airline operations can spend less time reacting to problems and more time focused on optimizing their business.

The new Boeing 777X does all of that — exceptionally well. It’s designed from the ground up to outperform against every metric, so airlines can rise above their daily revenue and operational challenges to focus on what matters most: securing passenger loyalty and servicing new destinations around the world.

 

 

777X Details & Specifications

The 777X will be the largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world, with 12 percent lower fuel consumption and 10 percent lower operating costs than the competition.

The 777-9X will have the lowest operating cost per seat of any commercial airplane. It will offer a range of 8,200 nautical miles (15,185 km) and seat more than 400 passengers. The 777-8X will compete directly with the A350-1000 and will boast an incredible range of up to 9,300 nautical miles (17,220 km) with seating for 350 passengers. The 777X is scheduled to enter service in 2020.

Like the 787 Dreamliner which was launched as the 7E7, the 777X will be formally named at a later date.

A robot that flies like a bird – concept of Shakuna Vimana

Posted by Vidyasagar Iyer on October 6, 2013 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , ,

A robot that flies like a bird – YouTube.

Plenty of robots can fly — but none can fly like a real bird. That is, until Markus Fischer and his team at Festo built SmartBird, a large, lightweight robot, modeled on a seagull, that flies by flapping its wings.

A soaring demo fresh from TEDGlobal 2011.
This is the same concept of Shakuna Vimana, the first kind of aircraft that is described in Vaimanika Shastra, Latest Technology has proved this to be right.

Germany – Still has the knowledge received from Samskrita, known to all, but the sources are hidden from public.

Learning from nature is what was done by the Sages earlier. they were not just the ones who sat and meditated for ages, they were the actual scientists who learnt all minor and major information from the Nature.

“First accept what is told, then discuss on it, later conclude the correctness.”

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes.

TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate

 

Blimps to Defend Washington D.C. Airspace : Discovery News

Posted by Vidyasagar Iyer on July 28, 2013 with No Commentsas , , ,

 

Blimps to Defend Washington D.C. Airspace : Discovery News

A pair of radar-equipped helium blimps tethered to the ground will give personnel the ability to see further away than with ground-based radar.

Blimps are experiencing a bit of a renaissance. Recently Montabello, Calif.-based Aeros said it was working on a rigid airship that could fly like a plane and float like a balloon. And now Raytheon has just finished testing a military aerostat of that, starting next year, will be a first line of defense for Washington, D.C.

It’s called JLENS, for Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor, and it’s a pair of radar-equipped helium blimps tethered to the ground that give personnel the ability to see further away than with ground-based radar. The two blimps work together with one using radar to “see” an enemy target and the other guiding a missile to destroy it.

Read more here

 

 

Students give wing to microlight aircraft

Posted by Vidyasagar Iyer on July 18, 2013 with No Commentsas , , , , , ,

A microlight aircraft, powered by a Yamaha 150cc engine, spanning 17 ft long, with a wingspan of 24 ft, and weighing 100 kg, has been conceptualised by four enterprising students of HKBK College of Engineering. 

Appropriately christened — MAQH13, with the letters derived from the foursome creators — Mohammed Muzakir sharieff, Mohammed Quamer Tawheed, Mohammed Akhib and Mohammed Hussain, the aircraft has been developed at a cost of Rs 50,000 and will run on high octane fuel, with the propeller, that will pull the aircraft, measuring 52 inch diameter.
The microlight, which is expected to take wing shortly, is awaiting the nod of the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA), according to Muzakkir Sharieff, one of the ideators of the prestigious final year engineering project.

To motivate the visitors and inspire young minds, the students’ team is planning to gift the plane to Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum (VITM), Kasturba Road, after the completion of the project and its airworthiness is proved and necessary certificate received.

The students were effusive in their praise for the support and guidance from Dr J Fazlur Rahman (IIT, Madras) and Principal, HKBK College of Engineering, Dr T C Manjunath, which helped them realise their dream.

via Students give wing to microlight aircraft.

Inflatable spacecraft: Blown up in orbit | The Economist

Posted by Vidyasagar Iyer on July 18, 2013 with No Commentsas , ,

 A plan to use enormous balloons to build space stations


THE International Space Station (ISS) is mankind’s holiday house in the sky. Like all such houses, it is a luxury item (costing $150 billion and rising). And like many similar projects on Earth, the owners cannot resist tinkering with it. It was in this spirit that, on January 16th, NASA announced that the ISS is to get an extension. This will not, as might have been the case on Earth, be a conservatory or loft conversion. Instead, it will be a BEAM, or Bigelow Expandable Activity Module.

 Bigelow Expandable Activity Module

Robert Bigelow, an American hotel entrepreneur and space enthusiast, has for years been pushing the idea that space stations should be made not of metal but of fabric. That would mean they could be folded up for launch and inflated in orbit.

An inflatable space station may sound like the proverbial chocolate teapot, but if you are going to have space stations at all, then inflation is not a bad way of making them. There have been many proposals in the past. Wernher von Braun, the patriotically flexible developer of the V2 military rocket (for Germany) and the Saturn V moon rocket (for America), sketched plans in the 1950s. The Goodyear Aircraft Corporation produced mock-ups in the early 1960s. In the 1980s the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory came up with a detailed space-exploration plan which relied on inflatable craft, thus quickly attracting the nickname “brilliant condoms”. And in the 1990s NASA proposed sending astronauts to Mars in an inflatable craft called TransHab.
Despite the branding possibilities offered by the Livermore version of the idea, Mr Bigelow and NASA prefer the less evocative term “expandable module” in their literature. Regardless of the name, however, making spacecraft and space stations out of fabric offers several advantages over the tin-can approach.
The most important is weight. Inflatable space stations are lighter than metal ones, and even small savings in weight make a big difference to launch costs.

Expandable modules may be safer, too. Ground tests by Bigelow Aerospace, Mr Bigelow’s vehicle for his orbital ambitions, suggest that the module’s walls—thick sandwiches of exotic fabrics such as Vectran (used in sailcloth and high-strength rope) and Nomex (from which fire-resistant suits are made)—offer better protection than metal ones against impacts from micrometeors and the increasing amount of artificial debris that is in orbit around Earth. They are also less likely than metals to generate dangerous secondary radiation when bombarded with things like cosmic rays. That is one reason why NASA was interested in using inflatable craft for the months-long journey to Mars.

Nor is the idea untested. In 2006 and 2007 Bigelow launched two unmanned versions, Genesis 1 and Genesis 2. BEAM, which will be bolted onto the space station in 2015, if all goes well, will be the last test of the technology before the launch of the firm’s intended commercial product, the BA-330. This will offer 330 cubic metres of internal space. At the moment the ISS has a volume of 916 cubic metres. The firm plans to launch two BA-330s in 2016, link them together in orbit, and thus create a station with 70% of the pressurised volume of the ISS for a fraction of the cost.

This first station, dubbed the Alpha Station, will be equipped with laboratory equipment, workbenches and the like. Bigelow hopes to offer 60 days aboard it for around $26m, assuming that its guests make the trip into orbit on one of the cheap rockets provided by SpaceX, another private space company.

Bigelow hopes in particular to win business from governments without big space programmes of their own. To that end it has memoranda of understanding with several, including those of Britain, Japan and the Netherlands. It is also wooing the private sector, though that may prove tricky. There has long been talk of the advantages of “zero gravity” (actually, the continuous free-fall of orbit, rather than the total absence of a gravitational field) for manufacturing specialised materials whose components are of very different densities, and for growing specialised protein crystals for examination by pharmaceutical companies. This was, indeed, one of the sales pitches for the ISS. Unfortunately, the private sector stayed away in droves, and the scientific output of the ISS has been pitiful.

If renting the Alpha Station out as a laboratory does not work, there is always the option of turning it into a holiday house. Given Mr Bigelow’s background, it is often assumed that this is the plan anyway. The firm insists that it is not, at least for now. But who will really be interested in paying $26m to go into orbit remains to be seen. Inflated space stations are fine, as long as they do not lead to inflated expectations.

Inflatable spacecraft: Blown up in orbit | The Economist.